PESW 2020
PESW 2020
The 8th Prague Embedded Systems Workshop
November 6-7, 2020
Virtual event organized from
Prague, Czech Republic
PESW 2020
The 8th Prague Embedded Systems Workshop
November 6-7, 2020
Virtual event organized from
Prague, Czech Republic

Keynotes

Security in internet of (safety-critical) things

Speakers: Tomáš Martinec, SYSGO, Czech Rep.

The presentation summarizes the outcome of an investigation of how the cyberattacks on safety-critical infrastructure are nowadays possible. The investigation was informally done based on internet research, interviews with various shareholders - admins, penetration testers and other security experts, owners of companies that manufacture IoT devices, and a few on-site visits in Czech Republic. Then, from high-level perspective some approaches and views on offensive and defensive tactics are presented. The presentation concludes with an explanation of a cyberattack on jeep Cherokee (2015) to demonstrate an example of hacking practices in IoT.

Tomáš Martinec

Tomáš Martinec graduated at MFF UK from Computer Science and he works in Sysgo where he is responsible for testing and certification of software with safety aspects. He mentors less experienced colleagues and has among other fields interest in securing safety-related devices.


Turris:Sentinel - scalable collecting network (big) data in practice

Speakers: Martin Prudek & Miroslav Hanák, CZ.NIC, Czech Rep.

Turris:Sentinel is a data collecting and processing system deployed on thousands of Turris network devices. It gathers gigabytes of data about cyberattacks detected by minipots also running on Turris devices. Minipot stands for the minimal honeypot, which detects only connection and login attempts made by attackers. Sentinel represents the innovative state-of-the-art solution for centralized data collection from a high number of devices assembled around the globe and connected to the Internet. Collected data are processed in real-time while flowing through various interconnected Sentinel components called a pipeline. Sentinel is highly modular, extensible, and scalable thanks to the right combination of the right technologies and microservice architecture. The data serve as an input to Dynamic firewall, which automatically blocks detected attackers on all Turris devices. They are also analyzed with various clustering algorithms and are statistically inspected because they provide a unique and exclusive source of information about cyberattacks.

Martin Prudek

Martin Prudek graduated from cybernetics and robotics at the Department of Control Engineering, FEE CTU and now works at CZ.NIC as the guarantor of Turris:Sentinel. He is a Linux/GNU and open source enthusiast and occasional teacher at CTU.

Miroslav Hanák

Miroslav Hanák studied Computer Engineering at CTU FEE. Currently, he works at Laboratories of CZ.NIC as a software developer. He actively participates in the development of Turris:Sentinel data-collecting system, especially on its minimal honeypots component.


Graph-Based Models in Prediction and Projection of Cyber Attacks

Speaker: Martin Husák, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Rep.

Predictive analysis allows next-generation cyber defense that is more proactive than current approaches based solely on intrusion detection. In this talk, we will discuss various approaches to predicting and projecting cyber attacks. Graph-based models are dominating the field since the foundation of this research area. Attack graphs were used to traverse through the attacker’s actions and project the continuation of an ongoing attack. Later, attack graphs were combined with Bayesian networks and Markov models to reflect the probabilistic nature of predictions and overcome uncertainties in observation of attack steps. However, there are still open issues, such as how to create such models and evaluate the predictions. The talk will shed light on using graphs in this research area and summarize resolved and open issues.

Martin Husák

Martin Husák is a researcher at the Institute of Computer Science at Masaryk University, a member of the university’s security team (CSIRT-MU), and a contributor to The Honeynet Project. His Ph.D. thesis addressed the problem of early detection and prediction of network attacks using information sharing. His research interests are related to cyber situational awareness and threat intelligence with a special focus on the effective sharing of data from honeypots and network monitoring.


Approximate Computing: Test and Reliability issues and opportunities

Speaker: Alberto Bosio, INL – Ecole Centrale de Lyon, France

Approximate Computing (AxC) is today one of the hottest topics related to system design and optimization. Thanks to this computing paradigm, designers are able to reduce area, power consumption, and even production costs in the case the target application can accept a given degree of inaccuracy in the final computations. This presentation discusses the impact of Approximate Computing on the test and reliability. More in particular, it aims at showing that it is possible to use Approximate Computing to implement low cost but still efficient test mechanisms and fault tolerant architectures.

Alberto Bosio

I have carried out all my studies in Italy, after a PhD in Computer Engineering in the area of digital systems dependability at the Politecnico di Torino (Italy) in 2006, I had the opportunity to obtain a permanent position as Maître de Conférences in the Université de Montpellier in 2007. From 2018 I'm a Full Professor at INL - Ecole Centrale de Lyon. The works carried out over 13 years of career let me be the co-author of 1 book, 38 international journal papers, 5 patents, 7 invited papers, 3 embedded tutorials and more than 120 papers in international conferences. I had supervised 13 Ph.D. students. I actively participated to 19 european- and national-funded projects and research contracts with industrial partners. I served as committee and organizing member in several international conferences as well as reviewers for many international journals. I’m a member of the IEEE and the Chair of the European Test Technical Technology Council (eTTTC).



Keynotes

Security in internet of (safety-critical) things

Speakers: Tomáš Martinec, SYSGO, Czech Rep.

The presentation summarizes the outcome of an investigation of how the cyberattacks on safety-critical infrastructure are nowadays possible. The investigation was informally done based on internet research, interviews with various shareholders - admins, penetration testers and other security experts, owners of companies that manufacture IoT devices, and a few on-site visits in Czech Republic. Then, from high-level perspective some approaches and views on offensive and defensive tactics are presented. The presentation concludes with an explanation of a cyberattack on jeep Cherokee (2015) to demonstrate an example of hacking practices in IoT.

Tomáš Martinec

Tomáš Martinec graduated at MFF UK from Computer Science and he works in Sysgo where he is responsible for testing and certification of software with safety aspects. He mentors less experienced colleagues and has among other fields interest in securing safety-related devices.


Turris:Sentinel - scalable collecting network (big) data in practice

Speakers: Martin Prudek & Miroslav Hanák, CZ.NIC, Czech Rep.

Turris:Sentinel is a data collecting and processing system deployed on thousands of Turris network devices. It gathers gigabytes of data about cyberattacks detected by minipots also running on Turris devices. Minipot stands for the minimal honeypot, which detects only connection and login attempts made by attackers. Sentinel represents the innovative state-of-the-art solution for centralized data collection from a high number of devices assembled around the globe and connected to the Internet. Collected data are processed in real-time while flowing through various interconnected Sentinel components called a pipeline. Sentinel is highly modular, extensible, and scalable thanks to the right combination of the right technologies and microservice architecture. The data serve as an input to Dynamic firewall, which automatically blocks detected attackers on all Turris devices. They are also analyzed with various clustering algorithms and are statistically inspected because they provide a unique and exclusive source of information about cyberattacks.

Martin Prudek

Martin Prudek graduated from cybernetics and robotics at the Department of Control Engineering, FEE CTU and now works at CZ.NIC as the guarantor of Turris:Sentinel. He is a Linux/GNU and open source enthusiast and occasional teacher at CTU.

Miroslav Hanák

Miroslav Hanák studied Computer Engineering at CTU FEE. Currently, he works at Laboratories of CZ.NIC as a software developer. He actively participates in the development of Turris:Sentinel data-collecting system, especially on its minimal honeypots component.


Graph-Based Models in Prediction and Projection of Cyber Attacks

Speaker: Martin Husák, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Rep.

Predictive analysis allows next-generation cyber defense that is more proactive than current approaches based solely on intrusion detection. In this talk, we will discuss various approaches to predicting and projecting cyber attacks. Graph-based models are dominating the field since the foundation of this research area. Attack graphs were used to traverse through the attacker’s actions and project the continuation of an ongoing attack. Later, attack graphs were combined with Bayesian networks and Markov models to reflect the probabilistic nature of predictions and overcome uncertainties in observation of attack steps. However, there are still open issues, such as how to create such models and evaluate the predictions. The talk will shed light on using graphs in this research area and summarize resolved and open issues.

Martin Husák

Martin Husák is a researcher at the Institute of Computer Science at Masaryk University, a member of the university’s security team (CSIRT-MU), and a contributor to The Honeynet Project. His Ph.D. thesis addressed the problem of early detection and prediction of network attacks using information sharing. His research interests are related to cyber situational awareness and threat intelligence with a special focus on the effective sharing of data from honeypots and network monitoring.


Approximate Computing: Test and Reliability issues and opportunities

Speaker: Alberto Bosio, INL – Ecole Centrale de Lyon, France

Approximate Computing (AxC) is today one of the hottest topics related to system design and optimization. Thanks to this computing paradigm, designers are able to reduce area, power consumption, and even production costs in the case the target application can accept a given degree of inaccuracy in the final computations. This presentation discusses the impact of Approximate Computing on the test and reliability. More in particular, it aims at showing that it is possible to use Approximate Computing to implement low cost but still efficient test mechanisms and fault tolerant architectures.

Alberto Bosio

I have carried out all my studies in Italy, after a PhD in Computer Engineering in the area of digital systems dependability at the Politecnico di Torino (Italy) in 2006, I had the opportunity to obtain a permanent position as Maître de Conférences in the Université de Montpellier in 2007. From 2018 I'm a Full Professor at INL - Ecole Centrale de Lyon. The works carried out over 13 years of career let me be the co-author of 1 book, 38 international journal papers, 5 patents, 7 invited papers, 3 embedded tutorials and more than 120 papers in international conferences. I had supervised 13 Ph.D. students. I actively participated to 19 european- and national-funded projects and research contracts with industrial partners. I served as committee and organizing member in several international conferences as well as reviewers for many international journals. I’m a member of the IEEE and the Chair of the European Test Technical Technology Council (eTTTC).